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Clinic Hours:
Mon-Fri 8 to 5:30
Sat. by appointment only

Location:
31310 Woodhaven Trail
Cannon Falls, MN 55009

Directions/Map
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Phone Numbers:
651-258-4050 office
651-258-4051 fax
651-222-0885 Twin Cities

Email:
info@cannonvet.com

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Laminitis

“Laminitis” is defined as any change of blood flow to the laminae of the foot. It is a painful and often preventable disease. Are we are killing our horses with kindness??? Learning about causes, signs, and treatments may prevent long term damage if laminitis occurs.

Causes:

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Digestive upset due to grain over load or abrupt change in diet

“Grass Founder” a sudden access to excessive amounts of lush forage

High fever or illness

Severe colic

Retained placenta in the mare after foaling

Consumption of cold water after exercise

Bedding that contains black walnut shavings
 

Signs of acute laminitis include the following:

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Lameness, noticed when a horse is turning circles

Shifting lameness when standing

Heat around the coronary band or hooves

Increased digital pulse in the hooves

Pain in the toe region when pressure is applied with hoof testers

A “sawhorse stance” with the front legs stretched out in front to alleviate pressure

Signs of chronic laminitis include the following:

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Rings within the hoof wall widen from the coronary band to the toe

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Bruised soles or “stone bruises”

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Widened white line, commonly called “seedy toe” Frequent abscesses occur

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Dropped soles or flat feet

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Thick “cresty” neck
 

The sooner Treatment begins, the better the chance for recovery. Diagnose and treat the primary problem (Laminitis is a result of systemic or other health problems in the body)

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Restrict diet; discontinue feeding grain based feeds and pasture; offer grass hay until advised otherwise

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Treat with mineral oil via nasogastric tube, to purge their digestive tract, when they have overeaten

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Dr. Winter will diagnose and administer the appropriate drug.

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Stable the horse on soft ground or bedding to encourage it to lie down. This will alleviate pressure from the weakened laminae

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Open and drain abscesses as they develop

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Communication between Dr. Winter and your farrier is important
 

Recovery can be exceptional or less than expected, and the horse can still go on to live a long, useful life.
If you are concerned or have questions, contact CVS.  
 

   

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