Clinic Hours:
Mon-Fri 8 to 5:30
Sat. by appointment only

Location:
31310 Woodhaven Trail
Cannon Falls, MN 55009

Directions/Map
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Phone Numbers:
651-258-4050 office
651-258-4051 fax
651-222-0885 Twin Cities

Email:
info@cannonvet.com

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Small Animal Emergencies

For many people, pets are considered their children. CVS takes emergency services seriously. Our certified technicians are trained to deal with these situations. It is important to call the clinic before bringing your pet in because Dr. Winter is frequently on horse calls during the day. For after hour emergencies, Dr. Winterís pager number is available on our answering machine. On weekends and overnights, it is advised to call and explain your situation to Dr. Winter before bringing the patient in. When necessary, he is able to call for extra assistance. It is important to understand what to do in the case of a pet emergency.

Below are a few common emergencies and what we recommend for first line care.

* The sooner you address an issue, the less extensive the treatment (i.e. lower cost) and the better chance your pet will have a full recovery.

Abnormal Urination:
Many owners believe that if their dog or cat is urinating in inappropriate places, that it is a behavioral problem. But in fact, it may very well be a serious medical issue such as: a urinary tract infection, bladder stones, rare parasites, congenital defect, or cancer. Pets suffering from these medical issues may exhibit signs such as: painful or frequent urination, bloody urine, straining to urinate, and frequent passage of small amounts of urine, abdominal pain or fever. It is advised to schedule an appointment with Dr. Winter as soon as you notice any abnormal urination behavior with your pet.

 

Cesarean Section:
Most C-Sections are not planned procedures. It is unusual for most dogs and cats to have problems delivering. Time is of the essence! It can mean the matter of life and death for the pups as well as your female. If your pet is experiencing the following problems, contact Dr. Winter immediately!
Prolonged straining without delivering
Extended duration between deliveries
A puppy or kitten is visibly stuck within the vaginal canal.

If your pet is unable to vaginally deliver, a C-Section should be performed to retrieve the remaining fetuses from the uterus. The optimum time to perform a C-Section is at the end of the gestation period, when the female is naturally dilated. This procedure has few complications associated with it and is well tolerated by most animals.

Canine Gestation Period

Feline Gestation Period

63 to 65 days.

58 to 68 days (average is 63 days).

 

Excessive Bleeding or Large Wounds:
If your pet has an abrasion, cut or an open wound that is bleeding excessively, it should have immediate attention. You should attempt to stop the bleeding by applying direct pressure with a clean towel to the bleeding area. A bandage should then be applied.
Contact Dr. Winter immediately!
Caution: The use of tourniquets can result in the loss of body parts and even life, if used incorrectly or inappropriately.

 

Feline Urinary Blockage (Feline Urinary Syndrome) FUS:
Feline urinary blockage is considered an emergency because it may cause life threatening complications. Most often, male cats are affected.
Signs of FUS include: straining to urinate or extreme pain during urination. Death may occur in cats that are unable to urinate for 3 to 6 days. If untreated, a simple bladder infection can quickly progress to a serious medical issue. If your cat is straining in the litter box and is unable to produce urine, this may indicate a urinary obstruction. It is very traumatic and painful for your cat and must be treated immediately. Cats may experience a painful abdomen and become lethargic. Monitoring the litter box for recent urination is important. An appointment should be scheduled with Dr. Winter as soon as possible.

 

Frequent Vomiting and Diarrhea:
Vomiting and diarrhea in pets occur for a number of different reasons such as: infections, parasites, foreign objects, etc. It is important to take your petís sickness seriously! Cases which appear to be minor may quickly become severe and even life threatening. As soon as symptoms of vomit and diarrhea occur, an appointment should be scheduled for your pet to be examined by Dr. Winter.



Heat Stroke:
Signs include: Excessive panting, reddened gums, vomiting, weakness, a blank or anxious stare, sudden collapse or coma.
If your pet suffers from heat stroke, brain damage or death can occur in a matter of minutes. Their body temperature must be brought down immediately. If possible, immerse your pet in cool water (for very small dogs, use lukewarm water). Continue until panting subsides. Applying rubbing alcohol to your petís pads also helps decrease body temperature. It is important to know that if the water is too cold, and if their body temperature is reduced too quickly, severe medical problems may occur. Check your petís rectal temperature every five minutes. Even if they appear to have recovered they should be examined by Dr. Winter immediately.

 

Hit-by-car:
If your dog or cat has been hit by a car, the first thing you should do is to observe their breathing. It is important to have your pet examined by Dr. Winter as soon as possible. For an after hour emergency, contact and inform him of your situation so we can better prepare for your arrival. As in humans, animals can go into shock or experience internal bleeding, (which is not visible to the human eye). Any external bleeding should also be addressed. Apply pressure to the wound if there is excessive bleeding. Be careful, an injured pet may bite!

 

Hypothermia:
It is a misconception to think that because your pet has fur, they are able to tolerate cold climates. In fact, our pets are just like us. They can suffer from hypothermia and frostbite just as easily as we can. Owners need to closely monitor their petís exposure to the bitter cold. If we canít tolerate the cold, then our pets canít.
Signs of hypothermia include: violent shivering, slow and shallow breaths, slow heart rate, pale or blue gums, lethargic, and death (if unable to increase their body temperature). Pets suffering from hypothermia must be warmed slowly! Owners can use a blow dryer over them, wrap them in warm blankets, or place warm water bottles (wrapped in towels) in their armpits or groin. Check their rectal temperature every five minutes. Pets suffering from hypothermia should be examined by Dr. Winter (even if they appear to have recovered).
Donít leave your dog or cat out in cold temperatures! The consequences can cost them their lives!

 

Labored Breathing:
If your pet is exhibiting signs of respiratory distress it is recommended to call CVS immediately to schedule an appointment as soon as possible. The vital signs should be examined, especially their gum color. The reasons your pet may be having difficulty breathing are: trauma, heart or lung disease, obstructions, or pneumonia. If your animal is showing signs of labored breathing, seek medical attention immediately!



Poisons:
If you believe your pet has consumed a toxin, it is very important to contact the vet and/or poison control immediately. Owners should bring the information regarding the consumed toxin along with them to CVS.
Toxicities can be lethal! Their affects can be immediate or damage may be accumulated overtime. Ingestion of poisonous substances can cause severe health issues such as: internal bleeding and irreversible organ damage.

COMMON POISONS:

o Mushrooms
o Chocolate
o Garlic
o Onions
o Grape
o Raisins
o Household Plants Household Cleaners
o Pool Chemicals
o Rodenticides
o Antifreeze
o Fertilizers
o Indoor and Outdoor Plants
o Human Medications
o Coins
o Bones
o Xylitol Products (sugar-free gums and candies)
o Excessive Amounts of Food and Garbage

These poisons, along with many others, are flavored and appealing to our pets. It is important to treat your pet like a small child by keeping all potential threats out of harms way. CVS recommends the Pet Poison Helpline which is a nationwide 24 hour call service for pet owners. They will charge you a $35.00 fee for consultation (have your credit card ready).

Pet Poison Helpline (800-213-6680) www.petppoisonhelpline.com

 

Seizures/Epileptic Episodes:
If your pet is experiencing a seizure it is best to remain calm. Try to avoid injuries by keeping your pet away from stairs or surrounding objects. Picking up an animal mid seizure is un-safe. A flailing animal is more likely to get hurt during transportation versus lying on the ground. When your pet is recovering from a seizure they become confused, scared and tired. The best thing to do is to keep them relaxed by placing a blanket over them and turning off the lights. If your pet has had multiple seizures they should be examined by Dr. Winter. Blood work should be performed and your pet may require lifelong medications to manage this disorder. Pets experiencing re-occurring seizures are likely to suffer brain damage. If left untreated, the other organs including the heart are stressed.
http://www.canine-epilepsy.net/basics/basics_index.html  (for more information)

 

Shock:
Signs of shock include: Pale gums, rapid heart and respiratory rate, lowered body temperature, inactivity, and rapid or faint pulse.
Shock is the partial or complete collapse of the blood vessels that supply oxygen to the bodyís vital organs. Time is crucial in this situation. Any injured animal may be overcome by shock. Cover you pet with a blanket to preserve body heat and make sure they can breathe.
Contact Dr. Winter immediately!

 

Canine Normal Vitals
Click here to print

Temperature

100.5 to 102.5 degrees

Pulse

60-160 beats per minute

Respiratory Rate

10-30 breaths per minute

Gum Color

Key indicator of health.

Moist pink gums are normal.

Pale gums indicate compromised circulation, which may mean shock.

Deep red gums indicate possible toxicity in their system.

Purple to blue gums indicate low oxygen levels or serious internal toxins.

Yellow gums may indicate liver problems.

CRT (Capillary Refill Time)

 If you press on the gum tissue (mucous membrane should be pink and moist) - it should take less than 2 seconds for the color to return.

Feline Normal Vitals
      Click here to print

Temperature

100.5 to 102.5 degrees

Pulse

150-250 beats per minute

Respiratory Rate

15-30 breaths per minute

Open mouth breathing is an emergency.

Gum Color

Key indicator of health.

Moist pink gums are normal.

Pale gums indicate compromised circulation, which may mean shock.

Deep red gums indicate possible toxicity in their system.

Purple to blue gums indicate low oxygen levels or serious internal toxins.

Yellow gums may indicate liver problems.

CRT (Capillary Refill Time)

 If you press on the gum tissue (mucous membrane should be pink and moist) - it should take less than 2 seconds for the color to return.

 


 

 
 

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